Tips for driving up to Denver

  #1  
Old 01-15-2015, 07:07 AM
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Default Tips for driving up to Denver

For spring break we'll be driving from OKC up to Denver. Never taken the escape more than Dallas & Tulsa (2-4 hours, mostly flat drives).
She just turned 80k; bought it new; haven't done much more than oil changes so far.

So any tips, advise for making the climb?
There's not really a red line; but I'm sure its not good to have extended periods of high (3k, 4k, ?) Rpms right?
I'll have the MECS pump replaced before we go (assuming a local dealer has 1 in stock)
The tires were changed a few years ago, still have about 2x depth from the wear indicators. Shocks & brakes are all still original.

Suggestions/tips please.
 
  #2  
Old 01-15-2015, 10:19 AM
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Default Re: Tips for driving up to Denver

My FEH statistics are about like yours. I'm not sure how much the altitude will effect the engine performance. I'm near sea level but routinely climb several freeway grades in my travels. I can maintain 65mph @4k rpm continuously, the water temp climbs over 190 but stabilizes there. If I have to slow below 65 it's difficult to get back there, so I try to stay at 65. Looking at the Scangauge later I'll often see that a peak of 4400rpm occurred. To run at 3k rpm would probably be 50-55mph, too slow for the freeway. I'd rather run at a lower rpm for sure but there's no way to achieve that in the FEH. I have to assume it won't do any harm.

If you have a Scangauge you could monitor various indcators, water temp, cylinder head temp, Met, horsepower, engine load (LOD?) but everything will certainly stay within range. There's just no way around running 4k rpm at times.
 
  #3  
Old 01-17-2015, 02:49 PM
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Default Re: Tips for driving up to Denver

Originally Posted by 08hybridok View Post
For spring break we'll be driving from OKC up to Denver. Never taken the escape more than Dallas & Tulsa (2-4 hours, mostly flat drives).
She just turned 80k; bought it new; haven't done much more than oil changes so far.

So any tips, advise for making the climb?
There's not really a red line; but I'm sure its not good to have extended periods of high (3k, 4k, ?) Rpms right?
I'll have the MECS pump replaced before we go (assuming a local dealer has 1 in stock)
The tires were changed a few years ago, still have about 2x depth from the wear indicators. Shocks & brakes are all still original.

Suggestions/tips please.

A name from the past: GPSman1 who is from the state. Has posted multiple times about driving in the "region" including pulling a trailer. Have driven on 6+ miles on upgrades in Pennsylvania (Turnpike, Rt 22 and I-80) without any issue and yes, your RPMs will likely go upward the 3000 mark. Nothing to worry about unless you are going when there is going to be heavy snow. Then you may have a tire issue.
 
  #4  
Old 01-19-2015, 06:32 AM
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Default Re: Tips for driving up to Denver

Thanks; I thought there was a member in the Co area, or frequently passed through.

I'll be in a caravan of other parents; just hope she can keep up!
 
  #5  
Old 01-26-2015, 01:08 PM
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Default Re: Tips for driving up to Denver

I bought my 2009 FEH used in the LA area in around 2011 and drove it from there to Missouri. I had 4 people in the FEH with luggage. I came across the Rockies on I-70 through Denver. I had absolutely no problem, and certainly no problem keeping up with anyone else. On long grades going down hill, if it's gaining speed over the cruise speed, rather than braking, you may want to shift to the lower "gear". I understand that it uses more engine braking and regen, but will save on your brakes. Certainly the rpms will increase going up steep grades, but not in any worrisome way. And certainly in low speed scenarios, you'll have lots more power than everyone else with the battery supplying a boost to the ICE.
 
  #6  
Old 01-26-2015, 04:32 PM
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Default Re: Tips for driving up to Denver

I have 80k on original brakes (and everything else for that matter) think I'm good t go, or time to change breaks, shocks, ???
 
  #7  
Old 01-28-2015, 10:07 AM
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Default Re: Tips for driving up to Denver

Well, are the brakes vibrating indicating a warped rotor? If not, I'd just have your mechanic check the pads. I can't really say whether you should have them replaced or not, that's a function of whether they're worn out or the rotor is warped. As for the shocks, I don't know that your trip to Colorado should dictate replacing the shocks. That's a function of ride and tire wear. And while we're on that, how's the tire wear? If I were you, I'd check the tires, maybe get the tires rotated and balanced, check all the fluids, maybe change the oil if it's near time, and take off and have a good time.
 
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Old 01-28-2015, 10:27 AM
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Default Re: Tips for driving up to Denver

Thanks. She's riding just fine. No brake shudder, don't notice any noise diving. So I plan on oil change, and tire balance /rotate. (almost due for all those). Treadwear looks even across all tires.
 
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Old 02-20-2015, 11:30 AM
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In 60/40 highway and city, my brakes original brakes have lasted 180,000 miles. I'll probably need to change them near 200,000 miles. With a gentle foot (good habits for getting as much regen as possible) the motor/generator does nearly all of your slowing.

Having lived and used my FEH in Mountain Terrain for nearly 10 years you will have no issues on highways and main roads. You don't need to drive differently than anyone else. You can run at 4000 RPM continuously but probably won't have to. It is a very capable "no compromise" vehicle.

Going down very steep back country trails and dirt roads can be scary. There is not much engine brake and the electric motors can't help you downhill at very slow speeds (but are great for uphill).

But I'm talking about hills that look like a playground slide.
Any road suitable for trucks and busses and you will be 100% fine.

Also, don't be afraid to use the really cheap Colorado Gas rated at 85 Octane. I used it exclusively for 8 years. The octane number changes because of altitude above sea level. These hybrid engines LOVE lower octane and are built specifically for it. Higher octane is actually a dis-advantage. When you change back to your home state the car will automatically adjust if needed.

Truth be told, there is negligible difference between 85 and 87 or 89 anyway.
But you'll save a few dollars per tank going with the lower number.
-John
 
  #10  
Old 02-20-2015, 01:53 PM
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Default Re: Tips for driving up to Denver

Thanks for the good info!

Went to Ford today to get my refund on my MECS, the first service people never head of a MECS pump!; but the service manager plugged info into a computer; says we need to inspect it & will get you a refund.... so hopefully in a few weeks! And since I replaced the pump in July 14, I guess I can feel confident it is working well, & I installed it properly! whew...

Also went to rotate tires today, they said they are just about worn (3/32 left); so unfortunately had to fork over more money I don't have for a new set; but will fell much more comfortable with fresh treads on!
 

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